Posts Tagged ‘football’

Sports | Nov. 15 12:01 pm EST
all-22

Columbia vs. Harvard

Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer

Columbia does not run the most dynamic offense in the world. If the offense has any animating principles, they are simplicity, power running, and timing-based routes. The Lions haven’t had much success this year with this offense.

Much of the rest of the Ivy League has moved this year toward a much more exciting and dynamic style of football. This style is animated by a few key principles: speed and a lack of huddling (a trend largely driven by Chip Kelly and the Oregon Ducks), the spread offense, and read-option running plays.

I am fairly certain that you’re currently wondering what the hell a “read-option” is. Simply put, it’s a running play where the quarterback has the option to either hand the ball to a running back or keep it himself. He chooses what to do by reading the defense—specifically, the actions of one player on the opposing team. When done well, it can be very difficult to stop. More »

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Sports | Nov. 11 2:57 pm EST
how about some sports

So what about Columbia Football?

Kiera Wood / Senior Staff Photographer

Is the Columbia football team a waste of money? This article in the NY Daily News weighs the pros and cons of cutting football. It is interesting to see an analysis of our athletics program from someone outside of the Columbia community. Here are the pros and cons, as put by the article, for dropping our football program:

Cons:

– The infrastructure is already there at Baker Field, the facilities are available and there is no prettier view from the press box anywhere.

– The program brings racial and geographic diversity to the student body.

– Some students (though not enough) still enjoy the whole Saturday football experience in northern Manhattan.

– A segment of alumni would be loudly miffed if the program were discontinued.

– The halftime band is a lot of fun.

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Spectrum | Nov. 10 9:45 am EST
getting graphic

Getting graphic

No need for an introduction – let’s talk about football.

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As you may know, Bwog’s coverage of the football team has gone the way of Chair Reviews: retired for the time being.

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Sports | Nov. 8 1:32 pm EST
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You can’t teach a young team experience

Kiera Wood / Spec

This has not been a good year for the Columbia football team. It’s been a case of everything that could go wrong going wrong, usually at the worst possible time. Columbia has been plagued by injuries, and the team is relying on very young, inexperienced players. This week, I’m going to take a look at a play from the Yale game where youth really hurt the Lions.

Columbia is down 23-6, but they have the ball at the start of the third quarter and they’ve just picked up a first down. The game isn’t out of hand yet, and it’s a big chance for the Lions to make it a close game.


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Sports | Nov. 2 1:32 pm EST
halftime update

Yale leads Columbia 23-6 at halftime.

At halftime, the Lions trail the Bulldogs in New Haven, 23-6.

Yale got on the board first, scoring on its second possession of the game. Quarterback Henry Furman made a couple of big throws on the drive, including a 16-yard pass to wide receiver Cameron Sandquist that gave the Bulldogs a first and 10 at the Columbia 35. The Lions defense regrouped and forced a field goal attempt, but Yale kicker Kyle Cazzetta’s 46-yard attempt narrowly cleared the crossbar to give the home team a 3-0 advantage. More »

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Sports | Oct. 26 2:51 pm EST
halftime update

Dartmouth leads Columbia 28-0 at halftime

Kiera Wood / Spec

At halftime, Coumbia football (0-5, 0-2 Ivy) is down four touchdowns to Dartmouth (2-3, 1-1 Ivy). The Big Green offense has seemingly overwhelmed the Columbia D to take its big lead.

Things didn’t start well for Columbia. After winning the toss, electing to receive, and promptly going three and out, the defense allowed a 10-play, 61-yard touchdown drive to put the Big Green up 7-0. Dartmouth wide receiver Jon Marc Carrier took in a two-yard reverse from running back Dominick Pierre over the right side for the score. More »

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Sports | Oct. 26 10:17 am EST
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How a botched offensive play led to the Lions’ Homecoming loss

Kiera Wood / Spec

I’ve talked before about how, in football, each offensive play is carefully scripted to try to yield a successful result. And last week I also discussed how playing smart — a defense knowing what an offense might try, anticipating it, and stopping it before it happens — is a big part of being successful on defense.

During the Homecoming game last week against Penn, the Lions were struggling on offense for much of the game. The defense was bending, but not breaking, and had kept the score at a respectable 14-7 in the third quarter. I turned to someone standing near me and said, “The defense is going to need to force a turnover to get us back in this game.” (Because it was Homecoming, it is entirely possible that this random person had no idea what I was talking about.) The Lions did just that — defensive back Jeremy Mingo intercepted a Penn pass to cut their drive short and give the Lions the ball at the Columbia 13.

It was a chance to turn the game completely around. Unfortunately, it led to freshman quarterback Kelly Hilinski’s worst decision of the game. More »

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Sports | Oct. 19 2:52 pm EST
halftime update

Penn leads Columbia 14-7 at halftime

At halftime, the football team trails 14-7 in its homecoming game.

The Lions (0-4, 0-1 Ivy) drew first blood against the defending Ivy champion Quakers (2-2, 1-0 Ivy), scoring on their third possession of the game.

First-year quarterback Kelly Hilinski connected with first-year wide receiver Cameron Dunn on a huge 46-yard pass off a flea flicker, giving Columbia a first and goal from the six.

The Light Blue wasted little time in taking advantage of the opportunity. Senior running back Marcorus Garrett punched it in on the next play, putting the home team up 7-0 with 4:02 to play in the first quarter.  More »

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Spectrum | Oct. 18 6:08 pm EST
HOMECOMING HAPPINESS

Five reasons you’re coming to Homecoming

Have you ever noticed that Columbia isn’t your typical college? We don’t dutifully attend all football games, spend 90 percent of our free time sunbathing on the quad, or live and breathe for “Meatloaf Mondays.”

We’re unique, it’s true. One of the sad but true things about Columbia is that we all individually take on a lot of commitments, making age-old traditions of our university seem… well, missable.

However, if there’s one football game Columbians are most likely to attend, it’s Homecoming. Show up prepared to see your entire school and then some. So maybe don’t paint yourself all blue—or do? Either way, Homecoming is one of the handful of events a large number of Columbians attend. Why, you may ask? Well let me break it down for you…

1. Day drinking in dorms—is there more to life? 

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This is one of your few moments as a young college student to wake up early and pregame in the comfort of your own room. Set your alarm early, shower, eat some carbs and begin your day of festivities.

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Sports | Oct. 18 3:22 pm EST
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Columbia’s smarts can serve us well in tomorrow’s game

Kiera Wood / Spec

Columbia football played its best game of the season this weekend against Lehigh, bolstered by a strong running game and a defense that forced two turnovers. Thanks to some poor planning on my part, though, I don’t have any video of this game to show you.

What I will do is break down a certain type of play — the screen pass — which is very common in football, then discuss how Columbia’s defense was able to make two big stops against Lehigh when they tried to run this play. More »

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